Why Businesses Must Care About Network Management

Why Businesses Must Care About Network Management

Jack Lopez,Director Advance Analytics,PepsiCo

Jack Lopez,Director Advance Analytics,PepsiCo

Today's network must efficiently support high-value solutions that transport data, video, and voice to and from users, requiring superior network service levels and infrastructure visibility.

The process of networking is the connection of network nodes to form a network. The network might be physical, consisting of cables and routers, or logical, wireless connections. Networking has risen to prominence as the most critical duty within information technology due to its necessity for a wide variety of enterprises regardless of size or industry. With networking becoming more difficult due to new technologies such as cloud computing and mobility, network administration becomes critical to the smooth operation of the businesses. Simple activities such as email usage, computer connections, security measures, and Internet access are all examples of simple activities. As a result, enterprises must place a premium on network management to remain competitive.

Concerns about network administration can be financially detrimental to firms with an online presence, engage with clients, or manage business partners via the Internet. As a result, network management's importance in today's digital business environment is invaluable.

Downtime is expensive

On average, a network outage costs a business $5,600 every minute. Not only may companies miss out on new sales, but they may also lose existing clients due to their inability to contact them. Downtime also increases operational costs, as it results in internal company disturbances. Employees are less productive when unable to contact coworkers or send emails. This is a dilemma for businesses with personnel spread over multiple sites. IT teams can employ network management monitoring and tools to identify potential problems and mitigate the impact of disruptions.

An unsecured network is not managed

Cyber-attacks and data breaches are virtually ubiquitous in today's networked world. While there is no single cause of cyberattacks, insecure networks bear some blame, with insider threats (both purposeful and accidental) accounting for 60 percent of attacks. Unsecured networks may potentially incur a high cost in terms of downtime. The average cost of a data breach in the United States is $8.2 million. Network management may play a critical role in preventing these problems. For instance, determining who is accessing networks may be a necessary first step in preventing malware and spyware from installing on employee computers.

Network management is composed of a variety of distinct components

Considering how an organization's network should operate at a high level and ensure it does so efficiently. In network operations, systematic monitoring is utilized. They identify and resolve issues when they arise, ideally before anybody else in the organization. The administration is the process of monitoring both the hardware of network resources (e.g., routers, switches, and servers) and the software required to operate them. This duty typically requires staying current on vendor changes and implementing necessary technological updates. Managing many physical and virtual firewalls from a single location is a common IT difficulty. Administrators are also responsible for monitoring network behavior and investigating questionable activity.

Additionally, these individual monitors the network to verify that it complies with applicable privacy, industry, and security standards—repairing and replacing malfunctioning or out-of-date networking equipment. Provisioning is the process of configuring network resources to enable access for various types of users, such as internal employees, external partners, and clients. Performance management is implementing measures to ensure that the network operates at peak efficiency. It entails monitoring and identifying which network devices are causing delays or bottlenecks.

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